Research Analyst

135 Duke Marine Lab Road
Beaufort, NC 28516
@

Corrie Curtice

Corrie joined the Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab in 2009 after completing her Master’s of Environmental Management at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment with specialties in coastal environmental management and geospatial analysis.  With an undergraduate degree in Computer and Information Science and 15 years of professional experience in technology companies, Corrie brings a unique perspective to MGEL.  Her project work includes examining issues surrounding the financing of conservation software tool development; a spatial analysis of birds, bats, marine mammals and turtles in conjunction with UNC Chapel Hill as part of a feasibility study for locating wind turbines off the coast of North Carolina;  and spatial analysis and modeling of marine animal habitat use, including Hawaiian monk seals and leatherback sea turtles (in collaboration with Scott Eckert).

Publications

Curtice, C., Johnston, D. W., Ducklow, H., Gales, N., Halpin, P. N., & Friedlaender, A. S. (2015). Modeling the spatial and temporal dynamics of foraging movements of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Movement Ecology3(1). http://doi.org/10.1186/s40462-015-0041-x

Ferguson, M. C., Curtice, C., Harrison, J., & Van Parijs, S. M. (2015). 1. Biologically Important Areas for Cetaceans Within U.S. Waters – Overview and Rationale. Aquatic Mammals41(1), 2–16. http://doi.org/10.1578/AM.41.1.2015.2

LaBrecque, E., Curtice, C., Harrison, J., Van Parijs, S. M., & Halpin, P. N. (2015). 2. Biologically Important Areas for Cetaceans Within U.S. Waters – East Coast Region. Aquatic Mammals41(1), 17–29. http://doi.org/10.1578/AM.41.1.2015.17

LaBrecque, E., Curtice, C., Harrison, J., Van Parijs, S. M., & Halpin, P. N. (2015). 2. Biologically Important Areas for Cetaceans Within U.S. Waters – Gulf of Mexico Region. Aquatic Mammals41(1), 30-38. http://doi.org/10.1578/AM.41.1.2015.30

Calambokidis, J., Steiger, G. H., Curtice, C., Harrison, J., Ferguson, M. C., Becker, E., … Van Parijs, S. M. (2015). 4. Biologically Important Areas for Selected Cetaceans Within U.S. Waters – West Coast Region. Aquatic Mammals,41(1), 39–53. http://doi.org/10.1578/AM.41.1.2015.39

Baird, R. W., Cholewiak, D., Webster, D. L., Schorr, G. S., Mahaffy, S. D., Curtice, C., … Van Parijs, S. M. (2015). 5. Biologically Important Areas for Cetaceans Within U.S. Waters – Hawai‘i Region. Aquatic Mammals41(1), 54–64. http://doi.org/10.1578/AM.41.1.2015.54

Ferguson, M. C., Curtice, C., & Harrison, J. (2015). 6. Biologically Important Areas for Cetaceans Within U.S. Waters – Gulf of Alaska Region. Aquatic Mammals41(1), 65–78. http://doi.org/10.1578/AM.41.1.2015.65

Ferguson, M. C., Waite, J. M., Curtice, C., Clarke, J. T., & Harrison, J. (2015). 7. Biologically Important Areas for Cetaceans Within U.S. Waters – Aleutian Islands and Bering Sea Region. Aquatic Mammals41(1), 79–93. http://doi.org/10.1578/AM.41.1.2015.79

Clarke, J. T., Ferguson, M. C., Curtice, C., & Harrison, J. (2015). 8. Biologically Important Areas for Cetaceans Within U.S. Waters – Arctic Region. Aquatic Mammals41(1), 94–103. http://doi.org/10.1578/AM.41.1.2015.94

Curtice, C., Dunn, D. C., Jason J. Roberts, Carr, S. D., & Halpin, P. N. (2012). Why Ecosystem-Based Management May Fail without Changes to Tool Development and Financing. BioScience62(5), 508–515. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/bio.2012.62.5.13

Gilman, E., Chaloupka, M., Read, A., Dalzell, P., Holetschek, J., & Curtice, C. (2012). Hawaii longline tuna fishery temporal trends in standardized catch rates and length distributions and effects on pelagic and seamount ecosystems. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems. doi:10.1002/aqc.2237

Curtice, C., Schick, R. S., Dunn, D. C., & Halpin, P. N. (2011). Home Range Analysis of Hawaiian Monk Seals (Monachus schauinslandi) Based on Colony, Age, and Sex. Aquatic Mammals37(3), 360–371. doi:10.1578/AM.37.3.2011.360