Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab

Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab

Working at the intersection of marine science, technology, management, and governance

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Full Time Staff

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Publications

About the Lab

The Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab has been at the forefront of marine spatial planning for the past two decades, studying marine ecology, resource management, and ocean conservation. We take marine analysis from data to decisions.

Our focus is on data analysis, and modeling linking biological, satellite, and ocean observing data to develop innovative analysis and visualization tools to inform management and ocean governance.

With locations at both the main Durham campus of Duke and at the Duke Marine Lab on Pivers Island in Beaufort, North Carolina, the lab works with students and faculty across disciplines.

Our Expertise in Marine Science & Conservation

Ocean Planning & Management: Marine-Life Data and Analysis Team (MDAT), Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal, Northeast Ocean Data Portal, International Seabed Authority, Regional Environmental Management Planning, Ecologically and Biologically Significant Areas (EBSAs), Biologically Important Areas, Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction | Marine Ecology: Marine Mammal Modeling, Fisheries Ecology, Sea Turtle Conservation, Marine Geospatial Ecology Tools | Blue Economy: Oceans at Duke, Wind Energy, U.S. Marine Cadastre

Flagship Tools & Datasets

MiCO is developing a system that aggregates and generates actionable knowledge to support worldwide conservation efforts for numerous migratory species and the oceans on which they depend.

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MGET is a free, open-source geoprocessing toolbox that can help you solve a wide variety of marine research, conservation, & spatial planning problems. 

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The world data center for marine mammal, seabird, sea turtle, shark & ray distributions.

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Characterizing and mapping marine life in the Northeast region to support the Northeast Ocean Plan. Creating “base layer” distribution products for cetacean, avian, and fish species.

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OBIS-SEAMAP: A New Look and 19 Years

Data, the word, is plural. Everyday English slips into treating the word as a singular, data is, but data are. Understanding the biodiversity of the ocean requires data that ...